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Grief, Loss & the Holidays

Blog Post created by 2364062 Administrator on Dec 16, 2015

I recently read a brief article from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization that listed tips for how to navigate the holidays if you or someone you know is dealing with grief and loss at this time of the year, and I wanted to put this out here in case any of you might benefit from this information.

 

Here are a few things to keep in mind...  [taken from article located at Griefs & loss during the holidays | National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization]

 

“And for those mourning a loved one – whether a recent death or one long ago – the holiday season which is customarily marked by celebrations and family gatherings can be full of painful reminders that heighten  the sense of loss.”  Often, friends and family members of those affected by a loss are unsure how to act or what to say to support someone struggling during the holidays.

 

Here are some tips from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization:

  1. Be understanding and supportive if someone wants to do things differently this holiday season.  Some people find strength in long established traditions while others may choose to avoid customs of the past and do something new. It’s okay to do things differently.
  2. Offer to help with decorating or holiday cooking. Both tasks can be overwhelming for someone who is grieving or overwhelmed by events going on in the world around us. Lending a hand can be a great way to let someone know you’re thinking about them and their wellbeing.
  3. Invite someone to join you or your family during the holidays. If someone you know seems down or depressed, consider inviting them to join you for a holiday concert, religious service or a holiday meal where they are a guest. You might even offer to accompany them on a holiday shopping trip where a friend and extra set of hands can be helpful.
  4. Ask the person if he or she is interested in volunteering with you during the holidays. Doing something for someone else, such as helping at a soup kitchen, staffing a coat drive, or working with children, may lift your spirits and help everyone feel better about the holidays.
  5. Never tell someone that he or she should get ‘over it.’  It can be important to acknowledge that a friend or loved one is struggling. Don’t discount their emotions, but give the person hope that, eventually, he or she will enjoy the holidays again.
  6. Be willing to listen.  Don’t avoid someone because you don’t know what to say. Active listening from friends and family is an important step to helping someone coping with grief or overwhelming feelings of loss. Letting them share their feelings can help healing.
  7. Don’t be afraid to remember someone who has died.  When someone is grieving, it is okay to let them know that you are thinking of the loved one who died. Cards, phone calls and visits are great ways to stay in touch.
  8. Follow up after the holidays to check in.  Given the activity of the season, some people may make it through the holidays without any issues but they might find the post-holiday period to be more difficult. So circling back after the holidays to see how he or she is doing can help.

“Hospice and palliative care professionals have always recognized the need to provide emotional and spiritual support to those who are dealing with loss,” added Schumacher. “Hospices often offer support to community members struggling with grief or loss so it might be useful to check with your community hospice to see if support is available.”             

To learn more about grief or coping with loss, visit NHPCO’s CaringInfo website, www.caringinfo.org

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